Role of the nurse leader in crisis management

January 14 2016|Guiding Principle
Related Topics: Ebola, Workplace Safety

Communicating internally and externally is one of the most difficult, yet critical, responsibilities leaders face. As our nation learned during Hurricane Sandy, the Boston Marathon bombing, the Ebola outbreak in Africa and other major crises, frequent communication and full disclosure is essential to maintaining credibility with the organization’s interprofessional team and the public. What is said (or not said) can be as important one’s actions.

In response to the aforementioned events, the AONE Crisis Management Taskforce and members of the American Hospital Association’s Society for Healthcare Strategy & Market Development (SHSMD) convened a Day of Dialogue to discuss lessons learned from past emergencies and the need for nurse leaders to be a valued member of the crisis management team. Participants used their experiences managing crises ranging from natural disasters, terrorism and treating infectious disease to identify the skills and behaviors nurse leaders need to effectively manage a crisis. The guiding principles and priorities below define the role and position of nursing leadership in any crisis, such as stemming from a mass casualty incident, technology outage, hacking, labor issues, natural disaster and biohazard or emerging infectious disease.

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